video

Buscada on CNN!

March 30th, 2012 by Kaushik1000 | No Comments

The CNN next list TV show and blog made a great video about our recent project Layered SPURA. The video talks about the history of the area and then visual urbanist approach taken by Buscada in creating dialogue between communities in the area.

Getting interviewed on a cold February morning by the CNN crew.

The Layered SPURA / City Studio project, headed by Gabrielle Bendiner-Viani, explores this complex site using a hybrid approach of pedagogy, art and research, and involves long-term collaborations between Lower East Side community organizations and students in Bendiner-Viani’s City Studio, a part of the New School’s Urban Programs. The Layered SPURA exhibition, a culmination of four years of student, faculty, and community collaboration which appeared at the New School’s Sheila Johnson Design Center in Winter 2012, does not suggest solutions for a place beleaguered by top-down planning, but rather hopes to spur new conversations amongst people with different points of view about SPURA’s past, present and future.
Find out more about this project : Layered SPURA

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How do you get people to engage in dialogue?

February 16th, 2011 by buscada | No Comments

In late January, Buscada attended the first of a series of meetings hosted by MAPP International Productions to plan a new arts and community-engagement project about global interdependence, inspired by the interdependence movement championed by Benjamin Barber and others.

The meeting brought together a collection of artists, writers and performers to explore ideas of civic engagement and art practice.

We took this opportunity to ask the diverse group one deceptively simple question :

How do you get people to engage in dialogue?

This is the beginning of a new project in collaboration with MAPP International Productions to understand the processes and practices of engaging civic dialogue, art practice and pedagogy. This project is a continuation of our work begun with The America Project Teaching Method.

How do you answer this question for yourself? How do you encourage dialogue? We hope this is the start of a long and productive conversation.

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Exploring SPURA

January 31st, 2010 by gabrielle | No Comments

Exploring SPURA

An exhibition by students of the City Studio at Eugene Lang College, the New School & Gabrielle Bendiner-Viani, in collaboration with SPURA Matters.

Opening Thursday February 4, 2010 6-8pm
February 4 – April 3, 2010

common room 2
465 Grand Street (enter on East Broadway)
NYC, NY 10002

The Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA) is the largest undeveloped city-owned parcel of land south of 96th Street, and it has been a contested site since it was cleared for “renewal” more than 40 years ago.

Please join us at a new exhibition by the New School’s City Studio, Exploring SPURA, which delves into the experience of living at SPURA now – the resources and restrictions – as well as the stories of today and the experience of the SPURA diaspora, displaced many years ago. The exhibition springs from the City Studio’s research in the community and hopes to continue encouraging productive conversation about the site’s future.

The question of SPURA is a timely one, as plans for its development are in discussion once more at the Community Board. Come join the conversation!

The 2010 City Studio creators of Exploring SPURA are: Sarah Charles, Jamie Florence, Leijia Hanrahan, Anke Hendriks, Lila Knisely, John Lake, Claudie Mabry, Katie Priebe, Adam Schleimer, Kaushal Shrestha, Emily Winkler-Morey and Hannah Zingre. Gabrielle Bendiner-Viani is the professor and exhibition curator.

The City Studio course of the Urban Studies department, Eugene Lang/New School explores the life of a small urban space, through archival, ethnographic, visual and participatory research. SPURA Matters is a visioning project for the SPURA site to get people talking about SPURA’s future. It is a collaboration between Good Old Lower East Side, Pratt Center for Community Development, and Place Matters/City Lore.

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Digital Hollywood

November 21st, 2009 by Kaushik1000 | No Comments

I just returned from the Digital Hollywood conference in Santa Monica, CA, I talked on a panel which was trying to understand how to best leverage video archives and assets for both large media companies and smaller non-profits.
I showed the PBS video platform on which I was the design lead. I discussed how the new tools we developed give PBS access to their own rich archive, and allow them to program in a new way online. These online video platforms in effect allow PBS to return to being true network producers: categorizing shows by content topics, not by the time-slots of linear TV. They are now able to create new channels of content by combining new and old shows with valuable web content for context.
New Model for video online
Step 1: Inputs
Archival video
New video productions
Live / Social web video
Step 2: Curation mechanisms and tools
Automated meta-tags
Editorial tools
Step 3 : New video Streams collections created
Topic-based
Editorial
Geo-tagged
Date-based
Author-grouped
Program-based
Step 4: Feedback loop
This model allows for easier access for the consumers of video, and allows companies who created video based content new and creative was of automatically and editorially creating new streams of video. Archival video juxtaposed with new and social web video to create new and unique video streams.
The highlights from the panel
Broadcasters are now broadcasting full episodes with much success and reaching new audience instead of cannibalizing old ones.
On the panel, a member of the South Park production company shared some really interesting insights about how their viewers watch South Park online. He explained that full episodes are a big hit online, and that people watch all seasons equally, so it is not just catch-up TV.
A 12-year-old today did not watch Season 1 when it first aired, so it is now new to them. This is a phenomenon of long term video archives: a  stream of younger viewers discover content for the first time, while other viewers tune in for nostalgia.
Digital Hollywood is on multiple times a year at different locations.
Find out more at: get URL :http://www.digitalhollywood.com/

I just returned from the Digital Hollywood conference in Santa Monica, CA, I talked on a panel which was trying to understand how to best leverage video archives and assets for both large media companies and smaller non-profits.

I showed the PBS video platform on which I was the design lead. I discussed how the new tools we developed give PBS access to their own rich archive, and allow them to program in a new way online. These online video platforms in effect allow PBS to return to being true network producers: categorizing shows by content topics, not by the time-slots of linear TV. They are now able to create new channels of content by combining new and old shows with valuable web content for context.

Read more

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Filed under: Conference, video |