Digital Hollywood

November 21st, 2009 by Kaushik1000 | No Comments

I just returned from the Digital Hollywood conference in Santa Monica, CA, I talked on a panel which was trying to understand how to best leverage video archives and assets for both large media companies and smaller non-profits.
I showed the PBS video platform on which I was the design lead. I discussed how the new tools we developed give PBS access to their own rich archive, and allow them to program in a new way online. These online video platforms in effect allow PBS to return to being true network producers: categorizing shows by content topics, not by the time-slots of linear TV. They are now able to create new channels of content by combining new and old shows with valuable web content for context.
New Model for video online
Step 1: Inputs
Archival video
New video productions
Live / Social web video
Step 2: Curation mechanisms and tools
Automated meta-tags
Editorial tools
Step 3 : New video Streams collections created
Topic-based
Editorial
Geo-tagged
Date-based
Author-grouped
Program-based
Step 4: Feedback loop
This model allows for easier access for the consumers of video, and allows companies who created video based content new and creative was of automatically and editorially creating new streams of video. Archival video juxtaposed with new and social web video to create new and unique video streams.
The highlights from the panel
Broadcasters are now broadcasting full episodes with much success and reaching new audience instead of cannibalizing old ones.
On the panel, a member of the South Park production company shared some really interesting insights about how their viewers watch South Park online. He explained that full episodes are a big hit online, and that people watch all seasons equally, so it is not just catch-up TV.
A 12-year-old today did not watch Season 1 when it first aired, so it is now new to them. This is a phenomenon of long term video archives: a  stream of younger viewers discover content for the first time, while other viewers tune in for nostalgia.
Digital Hollywood is on multiple times a year at different locations.
Find out more at: get URL :http://www.digitalhollywood.com/

I just returned from the Digital Hollywood conference in Santa Monica, CA, I talked on a panel which was trying to understand how to best leverage video archives and assets for both large media companies and smaller non-profits.

I showed the PBS video platform on which I was the design lead. I discussed how the new tools we developed give PBS access to their own rich archive, and allow them to program in a new way online. These online video platforms in effect allow PBS to return to being true network producers: categorizing shows by content topics, not by the time-slots of linear TV. They are now able to create new channels of content by combining new and old shows with valuable web content for context.

Highlights from the panel

Broadcasters are now broadcasting full episodes with much success and reaching new audience instead of cannibalizing old ones.

On the panel, a member of the South Park production company shared some really interesting insights about how their viewers watch South Park online. He explained that full episodes are a big hit online, and that people watch all seasons equally, so it is not just catch-up TV.

A 12-year-old today did not watch Season 1 when it first aired, so it is now new to them. This is a phenomenon of long term video archives: a  stream of younger viewers discover content for the first time, while other viewers tune in for nostalgia.

Digital Hollywood is on multiple times a year at different locations.

Find out more at: get URL :http://www.digitalhollywood.com/

Kaushik

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Filed under: Conference, video |

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